Geothermal heat pumps are over 4x more efficient than any fossil fuel furnace! 

lower your heating and cooling costs

30% federal tax credit, 25% state tax credit & Clean Heat utility rebates available!

State, federal & Utility
incentives available!

Use the natural energy found under your home to heat and cool!

Geothermal heat pumps utilize renewable energy for operation

why choose geothermal?

How Geothermal works

harness the thermal energy in your backyard

A geothermal heat pump does not create heat through burning fuel, it transfers existing heat with a heat exchanger (loopfield) in your yard. In the Winter, heat energy is absorbed from your yard and is transfered to your home. In the Summer, heat energy is transferred from your home and dispersed in to the ground. Once the heat exchanger transfers the energy between your geothermal unit and the ground, a refrigeration cycle elevates the 50 degree underground temperatures to over 100 degrees to heat your home. In the Summer, the process is reversed to cool your home.

Step 2
Transfer of thermal energy

Step 1
Power on Geothermal unit

Step 3
distribution of heating or cooling

When you power on the geothermal unit, a small amount of electricity is used to start your compressor, pumps and other essential items. This allows your heat exchanger (loopfield) to begin circulating water.

In the Summer, the geothermal unit removes the heat from your home and temporarily stores it in the water circulating in the heat exchanger (loopfield). The heat is moved through the loopfield piping and as it circulates, the heat energy is disbursed through the heat exchanger piping's surface area. 

In the Winter the heat exchanger loopfield picks up the heat energy from the ground (about 50 degrees F) and brings the heat to your geothermal unit. Once this heat energy reaches the geothermal unit via heat exchanger piping, the geothermal unit starts a refrigeration cycle that elevates the 50 degree ground temperature to over 100 degrees to heat the home.

After the exchange of heat energy occurs, the geothermal unit's transferred heat or conditioned air is distributed through the home. Heating can be distributed via forced air, baseboard, or radiant applications. Cooling can be distributed via forced air. 

Pond loopfields can be placed at the bottom of a pond or body of water as long as it is at least 6ft deep. The consistent ambient temperatures at the bottom of various bodies of water allow for a geothermal heat pump to successfully exchange and provide heat to a home. When determining your loopfield type, your design engineer will determine if the pond is large and deep enough to sustain the heat exchange necessary to maintain your home. 

Forced air

How Geothermal works

When you power on the geothermal unit, a small amount of electricity is used to start your compressor, pumps and other essential items. This allows your heat exchanger (loopfield) to begin circulating water.


Step 3: Distribution of heating & cooling


Step 2: transfer of thermal energy 


Step 1: Power On Geothermal Unit

A geothermal heat pump does not create heat through burning fuel, it transfers existing heat with a heat exchanger (loopfield) in your yard. In the Winter, heat energy is absorbed from your yard and is transfered to your home. In the Summer, heat energy is transferred from your home and dispersed in to the ground. Once the heat exchanger transfers the energy between your geothermal unit and the ground, a refrigeration cycle elevates the 50 degree underground temperatures to over 100 degrees to heat your home. In the Summer, the process is reversed to cool your home.


Step 3: Distribution of heating & cooling


Step 2: transfer of thermal energy 


Step 1: Power On Geothermal Unit

After the exchange of heat energy occurs, the geothermal unit's transferred heat or conditioned air is distributed through the home. Heating can be distributed via forced air, baseboard, or radiant applications. Cooling can be distributed via forced air. 


Step 3: Distribution of heating & cooling


Step 2: transfer of thermal energy 


Step 1: Power On Geothermal Unit

Essential Components

Types of heat exchangers (loopfields) that will allow for the transferring of thermal energy between your home and the earth.

Distribution systems

Forced air

With forced air geothermal systems, the heating or cooling temperatures are found within the geothermal unit on the fan coil. Air blows over the fan coil and distributes the conditioned air throughout the home's ductwork space. 

RADIANT

Radiant geothermal heat is available with "water to water" geothermal units. The geothermal system uses the elevated ground temperatures to heat water that is circulated through PEX tubing under your floors to heat your home.

BASEBOARD

Pond loopfields can be placed at the bottom of a pond or body of water as long as it is at least 6ft deep. The consistent ambient temperatures at the bottom of various bodies of water allow for a geothermal heat pump to successfully exchange and provide heat to a home. When determining your loopfield type, your design engineer will determine if the pond is large and deep enough to sustain the heat exchange necessary to maintain your home. 

pond Loopfield

Vertical loopfields are installed with a drilling rig, like how water wells are drilled. The rig drills a 6-8” borehole between 100-499’ deep (depending on the geological conditions of your yard). The footprint of each well is minimal, with the quantity of wells needed being dependent on the heating and cooling system’s size. Vertical loopfields are best for those with smaller yards. 

Vertical Loopfield

Horizontal Loopfield

Horizontal loopfields are best for those with a large yard and are typically around 100’ long, 6’ wide and 5-6’ deep. This type of loopfield is dug with an excavator and the space required will vary depending on the heating and cooling system‘s size. 

heat exchanger (loopfield) types

Geothermal baseboard heating is available with "water to water" geothermal units. The geothermal system uses the elevated ground temperatures to heat water that is circulated through your existing baseboards.

BASEBOARD

Geothermal baseboard heating is available with "water to water" geothermal units. The geothermal system uses the elevated ground temperatures to heat water that is circulated through your existing baseboards. Geothermal is a great option for replacing a boiler that feeds baseboard or cast iron radiation heating systems.

Radiant geothermal heat is available with "water to water" geothermal units. The geothermal system uses the elevated ground temperatures to heat water that is circulated through PEX tubing under your floors to heat your home.

RADIANT

With forced air geothermal systems, the heating or cooling temperatures are found within the geothermal unit on the fan coil. Air blows over the fan coil and distributes the conditioned air throughout the home's ductwork space. 

Forced air

Distribution systems

Geothermal

Natural Gas

vs

over 4x more efficient than a fuel furnace
no combustion (flame) heating
utilizes renewable sources
1 indoor unit for heating and cooling
ability to track performance data

only up to 99% efficient
burns fossil fuels inside home
separate unit for heating and cooling
old technology
Non renewable!

Geothermal vs Natural Gas

message*

Email*

Phone NumbeR*

Name*

* indicates a response is required

Get your quote started

address*

Celebrating Serving Western New York
For 15 Years in 2024!